Posted by: Anonymous Me | January 17, 2011

Poem of the Week!

I LOVE the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins. The twisty, tumbliness of his words is intoxicating, and the imagery bold and bright. I was going to go with my favorite poem of his but decided on this one instead. I had a dream about kingfishers a few months ago, and it remains vivid in my mind. According to Native American belief, the kingfisher represents balance of the physical, emotional, and spiritual, and the necessity of creating sacred space around you…all of which make this poem even more appropriate. 🙂

‘As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies dráw fláme’
By Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844–89)

AS kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies dráw fláme;
As tumbled over rim in roundy wells
Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell’s
Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name;
Each mortal thing does one thing and the same:
Deals out that being indoors each one dwells;
Selves—goes itself; myself it speaks and spells,
Crying Whát I do is me: for that I came.

Í say móre: the just man justices;
Kéeps gráce: thát keeps all his goings graces;
Acts in God’s eye what in God’s eye he is—
Chríst—for Christ plays in ten thousand places,
Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his
To the Father through the features of men’s faces.

I hope you have a great day!

Poetically,

Me 🙂

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Responses

  1. I had a kingfisher that I thought of as my running coach last year. It always talked to me as I ran along my nearby creek! Thanks for the reminder that I need to get out and run again!!!


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